Welcome to a new year

New to me is a new-born; baby, puppy, the first bloom of spring. New Year simply means instead of writing 2017, we erase the 7 and make it an 8 until it becomes a habit around the middle of February. Then, once we’re comfortable with it, January shows up, and like a wheel, our months revolve inside it’s circle.

We’d all like to think that everything becomes shiny and new.  The tight, form-fitting sling you fought your body into at 8:45, should fit fabulously at 12:01. (Not) Unless the oxygen supply has totally depleted and you’re, well… dead.

Unfortunately what I notice is the down swing of the lips. Day one, the resolutions.  Day two, the determination. Day three, the good intentions. Day four, if I give it one more day, it’ll be the weekend and then no one will remember what my resolutions were and I can try again next year. Yep, that pretty much sums up the ‘me’ exercise plan every year. If I  close my eyes, I’m looking damn fine. If I open them, okay, so never mind.

Yet when it comes to my writing, I’ve set goals. Great goals that I have every intention of adhering to, and, (fingers crossed) I intend to fulfill as many as I can. They are as follows:

Goals For 2018

One Eighty:    Twenty-five to Thirty Query Letters After Revising Letter / Follow-up on current submitted queries.

Complete:       Cozy Mystery Novella  and  3rd manuscript in DunMullers Series

Submit:           Magazine Articles  (1 per month)

Participate:     3 On-Line Writing Classes

Attend:             LTUE in Feb., Utah League of Writers Conference in Oct.

Read:                15 – 20 Books on Craft.

 

 

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It’s Holiday Time

Can I hear a Yeah!, Whoop!, Wow. great, whoopty do, big whoopee, yep, happens every year. Ah come on. It’s the big Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Years Cheer! Not the grumpy gus, the Grinch gripees, or the bah humbugs. Need a nudge. Pick up a puppy, mush your face it its chubby little tummy and do 10 raspberries. Better now?

Okay, you’re right. We should all do it our way. And this year, I’ll do it my way. I’m celebrating it with seven other writer friends by doing a holiday cheer website exchange. Each specific day for eight days of December, a writer will write a blog and give a website with a chance for everyone reading their blog to put their name in for a chance to win $40.00 gift care. Six of the ten writers are also putting in one of their published books, up – autographed, as a raffle prize too. Happy holidays. http://www.marymartinez.com/winter-holiday-blog.html

Doree.     Say in Touch. Holiday Blog Button.jpg

Bleeding the Turnip

I’ve talked about this before. The monies requested to learn all there is to writing. How to writer an eye popping query! Sign up here for 199.00. An Open Hour For Agent Queries here for only 299.00. What’s a synopsis? Learn how to describe your book in one page, for 350.00 The Blank Page. When you can’t start the story of your dreams? We’ll help you for a one time payment of 299.00. Point of View and Character Building Workshop – 499.00. And my favorite: Where has all my writing time gone? 20 Week Course 599.00.

And then, one day, before, during or after your educational bonanza, they say, “For a more in-depth interview with your character, I suggest you purchase Randall Rhubarb’s book, Gestures and Jocularity.  18.99 at Baker’s Books.  Do you see my point? Everything has a price tag. A price tag that, since I’m not a pro, is out of my price range.

There are conferences that are costing up into the thousands, workshops that can empty your wallet for almost the same amount. Travel, hotels, meals, etc. And I would love to do it all. But I can’t.

I’m married and every time I bring it up I have a husband that says it’s a scam. This whole writing thing is a great way for people to make money. They sell a couple of books and all of a sudden they’re Professor English.

I guess I’ll just have to unpack all my 40 year old English Class papers. Everything should be the same, right. I’m sure that nothings changed. Well, at least I’ll be saving a hell of a lot of money when I do.

Here’s to writing,

Doree

 

Cliche you say?

Dead as a door nail. Stiff as a board. Up and died.

If I had a nickle for every time you’ve asked me that, I’d be rich. In for a penny, in for a pound. Money doesn’t grow on trees.

No rhyme, no reason. Say what! What you talkin’ about,…….?

Cat got your tongue? Look what the cat brought in. Dead dog serious.

And trillions more.

In writing, stay as far a way from using cliches as you can. Yeah, it’s easy to fall back into things we’re heard time and time again. Because they’re comfortable, right? But they’re tired, give ’em a break.

If the original writer can spring forth a good saying, shoot, so can you. The only reason the grass is greener on the other side is because you didn’t have to come up with it. Be the one to write your own cliches for your story. If I’ve read the same expression over and over again, I get board and tend to stop reading. Might forget who the author was as well.

So, if somebody has died, ” They took a detour and found the six-foot underbelly of this life.”. Not: Clocked out, or  Kicked the Bucket. Use something from your own imagination.  You know, the little guy inside your head that paints your pictures. Get him to find the tack in your sand pile.

The sweet side of success: we all want it, but to get it, it has to come from you. It’s your story, your name, say it your way! Not like in this blog, that’s chock full of cliches!

So, if a tree hasn’t jumped out in front of you and smacked you silly, give it your own take. I’m coloring within the edges of my brain just to write this. And I know I’ll come up with some cliches for my own story.

Doree L Anderson

 

K.I.S.S.

Do you recall the saying ‘keep it simple, stupid?’ Or k.i.s.s.?

I do. I don’t remember how many teachers, in English or Art class, that utilized this particular acronym, reminding us that the simpler we make our sentences or our masterpieces, the easier it is for others to understand or evaluate it. Make it hard or in need of dissection and some say ‘forget about it,’ and move on.

Okay, no problems there. I was raised on the great literature of Fun with Dick and Jane. I can’t remember how many times I was entertained with “See Spot run.” But that doesn’t mean I don’t love to sink my teeth into a great read from Tolstoy, Clancy, or King.

The other day, this sentence was brought forth on my facebook page: 

Mouthful, right? I read it twice and thought that whoever would put something like this in a book isn’t looking for me as a reader. I wouldn’t bother finishing this one, no way would I buy another one. I read for entertainment, not for brain stimulation. But, some people do, and if they want to read something with sentences like this in them, I say all power to you. It is a legitimate sentence. I would have given it the K.I.S.S. rule, but hey, that’s just the way Dick and Jane rolled.

Doree

They Can’t Do That

Her blue eyes rolled across the room.
The wall sat in front of the kitchen.
The clock read four-fifteen.

As I’m reading I sometimes wonder, “Gee, can they do that?”

In reality, no. In writing licensing, no. In other words –
Her blue eyes can’t roll anywhere without assistance from the owner of said eyes. Therefore, this should be written as “she rolled or scanned her eyes across the room.”
As for the wall, only in a haunted house can a wall sit. This is an inanimate object so place it in your description. They’d built a wall in front of the kitchen area. (I’m not saying the tables didn’t dance – you have a couple of vodkas on the rocks and you can hear the curtains sing, for all I know. But the reader can’t and since it’s not an everyday run of the mill set of curtains, don’t have them sing.
And my favorite… I love reading about clocks that can read. I’ve yet to hear this, but it would seem that several writers have experienced this phenomenon.

Experience an adventure, read a book today!

Doree L. Anderson (doree.anderson@gmail.com)